Wedding Evening Reception

Wedding Questions

WHERE WILL OUR CEREMONY TAKE PLACE?

On board Warrior, both the Captain's cabin and the Officers' Half Deck have been selected as suitable for a Wedding licence. The Captain's Cabin is an ideal venue for the smaller wedding seating up to 25 and the Officers' Half Deck, adjacent to the Captain's Cabin can accommodate up to 100 guests.

WHEN CAN OUR CEREMONY TAKE PLACE?

Wedding Ceremonies can take place on board at either 1100, 1400 or 1715 hrs (this ceremony must be followed by an evening reception) The licensed area being used will be closed to the public 30 minutes before the ceremony to allow youruests to take their seats. The ceremony takes approximately 15 minutes and once you have signed the register, a glass of Warrior Champagne will be served to you and your guests with the Captain's compliments. The area will remain closed for a sufficient time to enable you to enjoy the surroundings and capture the moment with photographs.

WHO PERFORMS THE CEREMONY?

Registrars from Portsmouth Register Office will perform the ceremony for you, please contact them for further information regarding the service and costs to attend. Tel 023 92829041.

CAN WE PLAY MUSIC AT THE CEREMONY?

Musicians such as a quartet or harpist can augment the occasion and we shall be happy to recommend a selection of choices for you. Alternatively we can supply a CD player for you that will be set up before the ceremony. Any music, readings or words must be of a nonreligious nature and checked by the Registrars prior to the ceremony.

HOW DO WE ARRANGE FOR OUR GUESTS TO GAIN ADMISSION?

It should be appreciated that HMS Warrior 1860 lies within Portsmouth's Naval Base and therefore comes under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Defence Security Guard. Therefore we must adhere to strict regulations set up in accordance with the Naval Base. Arrangements can be made for three wedding cars to enter the Naval Base via Unicorn gate and to drive onto and park on Warrior's jetty. All other cars must park outside the base and guests will enter on foot via Victory Gate. We request that a full alphabetical list of guests is forwarded to the ship along with wedding car registration numbers and passengers no later than three working days before the event so that we can perform the necessary administration to gain access.

ARE THERE ANY RESTRICTIONS WHICH WE SHOULD BE AWARE?

In view of the historic nature and construction of HMS Warrior, smoking is not allowed on board in any area. Smoking is permitted only on the concrete jetty adjacent to the ship. Ladies are to be made aware that stiletto or very narrow healed shoes are not permitted onboard due to the damage caused to the decks and for personal safety. There must be no confetti, rice or helium balloons on board or the jetty alongside the ship.

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

If you would like to proceed further you should:

1. Check with the Special Events Department on 023 92778604, that the ship is available for you at the time and date of your choice Then make a provisional reservation and arrange an appointment to visit the ship.

2. Contact Portsmouth Register Office on 023 92829041, and make a booking with the Marriage Office. The registrar will then advise you of the legalities and costs involved.

3. When the booking is confirmed with the Registrars, please send us a letter of confirmation along with your deposit payment as detailed on the price list enclosed.

ARE THERE DISABLED FACILITIES ON BOARD?

There is a chairlift to enable elderly or disabled guests to access the Main Gun Deck level (please note this chairlift has a 15 stone weight limit). There is also an easy access toilet on this level. The ship has a wheelchair and walking frame for guests to use whilst on board.

Educational Visits

Discovery Visits

Workshops

Story Time

Learning

WELCOME ON BOARD HMS WARRIOR 1860, BRITAIN'S FIRST IRON-HULLED, ARMOURED BATTLESHIP

Launched in 1860, at a time of empire and Britain's dominance in trade and industry, Warrior was the pride of Queen Victoria's fleet. Powered by steam and sail, she was the largest, fastest and most powerful ship of her day and had a lasting influence on naval architecture and design. Echoing shifts in Victorian society, work and life on board also reflected many of the social changes the Royal Navy experienced as it evolved into a professional service from the mid-nineteenth century.

Whether studying Victorian or local history, literacy, nineteenth century literature or STEM, Warrior provides a unique and inspiring venue for learning across the curriculum for all your pupils whatever their age or ability. We offer a wide range of fun, hands-on and immersive workshops, discovery visits and other learning activites throughout the year. Where else can you come aboard a floating Victorian warship, try out a hammock, sit at a mess table, peer inside a furnace and even watch the engine machinery in motion?

If you would like more information regarding our Learning Programme or cannot find a workshop to suit the needs of your pupils please do not hesistate to contact us on learning@hmswarrior.org.

 

"Warrior - potent source of education and inspiration for our children....."
Sir John Smith, President of the Warrior Preservation Trust (1985-2007)

Workshops

Workshops, Talks and Guided Tours

HMS WARRIOR 1860, the warship that revolutionised the Victorian navy!  We offer an exciting programme of fun, active and inspiring curriculum linked workshops and study days in a unique environment that cover a wide variety of subjects and interests. We are also happy to work with you to create a special session for your pupils.

Launched in 1860, HMS Warrior was the pride of Queen Victoria’s fleet. The world’s first iron-hulled armoured battleship, powered by sail and steam, she was the largest, fastest, most powerful ship of her day. The only surviving member of Queen Victoria’s Black Battlefleet, Warrior has been restored to her original condition and offers four vast decks for you to explore and a unique learning environment for your pupils.

Where else can you try out a hammock, sit at a mess table, peer inside a furnace and watch the engine machinery in motion?

 

Schools Programme 2016-2017

HMS Warrior

HMS Warrior

Volunteers

Volunteers at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard

HMS Warrior Team

Some of The Team

Gangplank

Warrior 1860

Support Us

HMS Warrior is one of the world's most significant historic warships.

The ship is the responsibility of the Warrior Preservation Trust, an independent charity established by Sir John Smith that is not supported by any Government Department. It depends entirely on income raised from visitors, corporate hospitality and weddings, filming, fundraising and the generosity of its supporters to preserve the ship to a high and safe standard for the benefit of this and future generations.

Warrior is the only surviving embodiment of the most revolutionary changes to take place in the long and distinguished history of the Royal Navy, spanning the eras of wood, iron, sail and steam. When built in 1860, no warship was the focus of so much attention or had such a profound effect on naval architecture. Few ships subsequently, can have led such a chequered life as Warrior, which has in turn been the pride of the nation, a forgotten hulk, and today a national treasure to be preserved for posterity.

"If every warship in the 19th century still existed and was available for preservation, Warrior would still be my first choice"
Sir John Smith

WARRIOR CAM : LIVE VIEWS OVER PORTSMOUTH HARBOUR

From the half-moon high in the mizzen mast of this famous Victorian Warship, The Warrior Cam commands stunning views over Portsmouth, Gosport and the Isle of Wight as well as the Historic Dockyard. The camera pans between vistas approximately every 10 seconds, broadcasting live video around the clock. This webcam has been installed to help raise awareness of this stunning historic ship. Please help us by telling others about it.

WEBCAM VIEWS

Camera views are changes periodically to take in the sights and events of Portsmouth Harbour. Below is more information about some of the regular stops.

Stern

The decorative pattern seen looking down at the ship's stern are the brass rails that allowed for the easy re-positioning of Warrior's devastating 110lb Armstrong gun - visible in the centre of the picture. Keep your eyes open for happy couples celebrating weddings on board HMS Warrior and posing in for photos in this popular spot.

Portsmouth Ferries

Time it right and you might catch a number of ferries. The small green ferries shuttle passengers to and from Gosport whilst the Wight Link ships take cars and passengers to the Isle of Wight. The larger Brittany and Condor Ferries service the Jersey, Guernsey, France and Spain.

Deck from the mizzen

This dizzying view shows off our web cams mast top location and also provides a great opportunity for visitors to HMS Warrior to give a wave to friends and relatives watching online. The camera returns to this spot approximately every two minutes.

South Railway Jetty

This jetty was originally constructed in the 1860s to enable Queen Victoria and family to easily move from train to ship. Today it is more frequently used as a stop for Royal Naval warships and visiting ships from foreign navies.

Gosport Ferry

The route this busy ferry takes might only cover a third of a mile of water, but it saves a journey of over 14 miles by car. This view also takes in Gosport Marina and gives a great view of the busy route in and out of the harbour.

Harbour Entrance

Its narrow entrance is one of the features that has made Portsmouth Harbour such an important naval stronghold throughout history. On the left of the picture is Old Portsmouth with its cobbled streets and historic pubs.

Semaphore Tower

Semaphore tower is one of the more instantly recognisable buildings in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard and is today home for the Queens Harbour Master who control the movement of all large vessels around the harbour.

The time is now...

Just to prove that the camera is live, this shot takes in the clock tower of the Vulcan Building and Gun Wharf. Behind the clock tower Southsea Cenotaph can be seen with Spitbank Fort visible to the right of the picture.

Tide State

This view shows the current state of the tide as we look down at “The Hard”. To the right of the image Portsmouth Harbour train station can be seen between the ship’s rigging.

Masts of HMS Victory

Peeking through Warriors rigging we get a glimpse of Lord Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory currently undergoing restoration work to her masts and rigging. HMS Victory sits in dry dock alongside the Mary Rose Museum, just out of shot to the right.

Ensign

During daylight the Ship's Red Ensign can be seen waving in the Portsmouth Sea breeze giving a good indication of the wind state in the harbour.

Spinnaker Tower

Standing watch over Portsmouth Harbour the Spinnaker tower offers unrivalled views over Portsmouth, the Solent and a surprising amount of the surrounding area. Those taking the lift to the viewing platforms also get treated to bird-eye view back down to HMS Warrior and Portmouth Historic Dockyard.

The decorative pattern seen looking down at the ship's stern are the brass rails that allowed for the easy re-positioning of Warrior's devastating 110lb Armstrong gun - visible in the centre of the picture. Keep your eyes open for happy couples celebrating weddings on board HMS Warrior and posing in for photos in this popular spot.

Time it right and you might catch a number of ferries. The small green ferries shuttle passengers to and from Gosport whilst the Wight Link ships take cars and passengers to the Isle of Wight. The larger Brittany and Condor Ferries service the Jersey, Guernsey, France and Spain.

This dizzying view shows off our web cams mast top location and also provides a great opportunity for visitors to HMS Warrior to give a wave to friends and relatives watching online. The camera returns to this spot approximately every two minutes.

This jetty was originally constructed in the 1860s to enable Queen Victoria and family to easily move from train to ship. Today it is more frequently used as a stop for Royal Naval warships and visiting ships from foreign navies.

The route this busy ferry takes might only cover a third of a mile of water, but it saves a journey of over 14 miles by car. This view also takes in Gosport Marina and gives a great view of the busy route in and out of the harbour.

Its narrow entrance is one of the features that has made Portsmouth Harbour such an important naval stronghold throughout history. On the left of the picture is Old Portsmouth with its cobbled streets and historic pubs.

Semaphore tower is one of the more instantly recognisable buildings in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard and is today home for the Queens Harbour Master who control the movement of all large vessels around the harbour.

Just to prove that the camera is live, this shot takes in the clock tower of the Vulcan Building and Gun Wharf. Behind the clock tower Southsea Cenotaph can be seen with Spitbank Fort visible to the right of the picture.

This view shows the current state of the tide as we look down at “The Hard”. To the right of the image Portsmouth Harbour train station can be seen between the ship’s rigging.

Peeking through Warriors rigging we get a glimpse of Lord Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory currently undergoing restoration work to her masts and rigging. HMS Victory sits in dry dock alongside the Mary Rose Museum, just out of shot to the right.

During daylight the Ship's Red Ensign can be seen waving in the Portsmouth Sea breeze giving a good indication of the wind state in the harbour.

Standing watch over Portsmouth Harbour the Spinnaker tower offers unrivalled views over Portsmouth, the Solent and a surprising amount of the surrounding area. Those taking the lift to the viewing platforms also get treated to bird-eye view back down to HMS Warrior and Portmouth Historic Dockyard.

Warrior was designed and built in response to an aggressive French shipbuilding programme which saw the introduction of the first iron-clad warship La Gloire designed by the brilliant naval architect Stanislas Charles Henri Dupuy de Lome.

Determined to see off this challenge to the supremacy of the Royal Navy the then First Lord of the Admiralty, Sir John Somerset Pakington, determined to build a ship so superior in terms of quality, speed, size, armament and armour that it would be inconceivable to France that she could take Britain on in a sea battle.

When commissioned by Captain the Hon. Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane, on August 1st 1861, Warrior was the largest warship in the world, at 9,210 tons displacement she was fully 60% larger than La Gloire.

The ship underwent minor modifications after a sea trial. In June 1862, she started active service in the Channel Squadron, patrolling coastal waters and sailing to Lisbon and Gibraltar.

Having introduced a revolution in naval architecture, by 1864 Warrior was superseded by faster designs, with bigger guns and thicker armour. By 1871 she was no longer regarded as the crack ship she had once been, and her roles were downgraded to Coastguard and reserve services. In May of 1883 her fore and main masts were found to be rotten, and not considered worth the cost of repair, Warrior was placed in the reserve, eventually converted to a floating school for the Navy and re-named Vernon III in 1904.

Put up for sale as scrap in 1924, no buyer could be found, and so, in March 1929 she left Portsmouth to be taken to Pembroke Dock and converted into a floating oil pontoon, re-named again as Oil Fuel Hulk C77. By 1978, she was the only surviving example of the 'Black Battlefleet' - the 45 iron hulls built for the Royal Navy between 1861 and 1877.

Warrior was obsolete within a decade. She was relegated to the reserve Fleet ranks and in 1883, withdrawn from sea service. She was now little more than a floating hulk, although still officially classed an armoured cruiser.

Her masts and guns were stripped when she was used as a depot ship for two years. Her name became Vernon III, the Navy's torpedo training school. Her role was supplying steam and electricity to neighbouring hulks. A year later, another armoured cruiser called Warrior was launched.

Nobody wanted the old battleship when she went up for sale in 1924. Five years on, she inherited the name Oil Fuel Hulk C77 when starting life as a ship keeper's home and floating oil jetty at Pembroke Dock in Wales.

Some 5,000 ships refuelled alongside her in her 50 years at Pembroke. However, the Royal Navy kept her in reasonable condition with occasional maintenance trips into dry dock keeping her hull intact. Warrior was the only example of the 45 iron hulls built between 1861 and 1877 to survive.

In 1883 Warrior had been superseded by newer, better armed and protected ships. On May 14th she entered Portsmouth for the last time under her own steam. In her 22 years of service, six of them in full commission and eight as a first line reserve, Warrior had sailed some 90,000 sea miles without ever seeing an enemy ship or firing a shot in anger. She had now been withdrawn from sea service - her engines, boilers and guns stripped out and, for several years she languished in 'Rotten Row', a remote corner of Portsmouth Harbour. Now little more than a floating hulk, although still officially classed an armoured cruiser Warrior was progressively forgotten.

In 1902, Warrior took on a new lease of life as she was fitted out to become mother ship to the Portsmouth flotilla of small torpedo boats. But this role was only a brief one. In 1904 she became part of the Royal Navy's Torpedo Training School at Portsmouth and was renamed Vernon III. It was hardly a return to glory as she was used to supply steam and electricity to other hulks moored alongside. A new armoured cruiser, launched in 1905, took Warrior's name.

In 1923 Vernon moved ashore and once more Warrior was paid off. But again she survived at a time when her sister ship Black Prince and many others went to the scrapyard. She was offered for sale - but there were no takers. Finally because the hull was still in excellent condition, Warrior was converted and in 1929 towed to Milford Haven for use as a floating oil jetty.

Nobody wanted the old battleship when she went up for sale in 1924. But 1929 saw another change and another name. Rescued from possible destruction - a fate suffered by her sister ship Black Prince - she was towed to Pembroke Dock in Milford Haven to begin a new life and served for 50 years as an oil jetty under the name of Oil Fuel Hulk C77. Warrior acted as home to a shipkeeper and his family.

Some 5,000 ships refuelled alongside Warrior and her armoured hull showed little sign of deterioration. She was kept in reasonable condition by the Royal Navy who dry docked her regularly. As a result Warrior was the only example of the 45 ironclads built between 1861 and 1877 to survive.

When in 1960, HMS Vanguard submitted to the cutting torch, Warrior remained as Britain's last surviving battleship - a fact not lost on several influential people

HMS Warrior Wedding

Romantic ~ Beautiful ~ Unique

HMS Warrior Wedding

Romantic ~ Beautiful ~ Unique

HMS Warrior Wedding

Romantic ~ Beautiful ~ Unique

HMS Warrior Wedding

Romantic ~ Beautiful ~ Unique

HMS Warrior Wedding

Romantic ~ Beautiful ~ Unique

HMS Warrior Wedding

Romantic ~ Beautiful ~ Unique

Prawn Cocktail

Experience Caterers

Weddings On Board HMS Warrior

HMS Warrior is a truly unique wedding venue, offering a blend of romance, style and individuality that will make your day as memorable as it is special. The beauty of design and high quality workmanship that made the HMS Warrior the pride of the British fleet make it an unequalled venue for your wedding and reception.

The ceremony itself will be held, according to your wish, either in the grandeur of the Captain's cabin or upon the Officers' Half Deck. Your wedding can take place at 1100, 1400 or 1715 (when followed by evening reception) providing stunning day light views for you and your guests across Portsmouth harbour.

HMS Warrior is the most unusual and enchanting wedding venue Hampshire has to offer, resonant with an illustrious history of Royal visits and military service. The unparalleled experience that is offered by this sought after Portsmouth wedding venue will exceed your expectations in every way. There are also a range of services available designed to help you to make your wedding everything that you want it to be.

WEDDING BROCHURE

To follow shortly.

Landing Page Contact Form

Do fantastic fund-raising events

We went to the Trafalgar Night Event this year and had a wonderful time. The food and entertainment were fabulous. You dine on the gun deck, between the cannon. It is well worth checking out the website for other events as they do 4 or 5 a year. This was the second event we've attended (can recommend the Sea Shanty Night too), but definitely not the last.

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